Undergraduate Studies

Undergraduate Courses

  • SOC 100 General Sociology. (GT-SS3, AUCC 3C). This course is designed to provide you with a broad introduction to the field of sociology. This course is designed to introduce you to what sociologist C. Wright Mills called “the sociological imagination,” a way of looking at the world that sees connections between individual experiences and the larger society. The class provides you with an introductory analysis of society including major theories of culture, society, social processes, community, and institutions. (NT-O)
  • SOC 105 Social Problems. (GT-SS3, AUCC 3C). This course is designed to introduce you to the study of social problems. The course will depart from most traditional approaches to social problems by giving emphasis to a global rather than a U.S. focused analysis of the subject. This course explores the origin, current status and future dimensions of a range of social problems. We will draw upon several distinct traditions to understand differing views of social problems from within the Sociological perspective. (NT-O)
  • SOC 192 Civic Culture and Social Responsibility. Erosion of civility in society with particular emphasis on civic culture on the university campus.
  • SOC 205 Contemporary Race-Ethnic Relations. (GT-SS3, AUCC 3E). This course is designed to introduce you to the sociological study of race and ethnicity. The class enhances your awareness of the major concepts, theories, and research pertaining to racial and ethnic relations in the United States. We study how the concepts of race and ethnicity have evolved historically and sociologically. We also examine such social problems as the nature and causes of racism, stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination, and exploitation. Additionally, we explore the changing complexion of relations among people in the U.S. and the world. (NT-O)
  • SOC 210 Quantitative Sociological Analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 118. This course is designed to introduce you to statistics and the use of statistics within the field of Sociology. The course differs from a general statistics course in that it emphasizes quantitative analysis of society.
  • SOC 220 Global Environmental Issues. This course is designed to explore the relationship between human societies and the larger natural environment from points around the world. We use a cross-section of sociological modes of analysis in order to investigate this relationship. We study both local and global environmental issues. We also address the sociological underpinnings of conflicts and inequalities around the world that are linked to such issues as natural resource use, food, wilderness preservation, population, and global climate change.
  • SOC 253 Introduction to Criminal Justice. This course is designed to provide you with an overview of the criminal justice system and its major components. Throughout this course, we will focus on popular mythology regarding crime control policy and discuss how the criminal justice system really operates in society. We will study criminal justice from an interdisciplinary perspective, drawing upon the fields of sociology, philosophy, history, economics, law, and political science. Such a perspective is geared toward understanding criminal justice within the larger social contexts in which it is practiced.
  • SOC 275 (Also ANTH275) Introduction to Forensic Anthropology. Forensic anthropological theory and methods including estimation of age-at-death, sex, stature, ancestry, and trauma analysis.
  • SOC 301 Development of Sociological Thought. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. This course is designed to provide an introduction to the thought of seven important early sociological theorists: Durkheim, Marx, Weber, Martineau, Simmel, Du Bois and Mannheim. This course’s study of classical sociology aims to provide the student with the ability to understand the varied roots of sociological theorizing, to better appreciate the current theoretical contours of the discipline, and to begin to develop her or his own conceptual framework for analyzing contemporary society.
  • SOC 302 Contemporary Sociological Theory. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Theoretical approaches and models in sociology.
  • SOC 311 Methods of Sociological Inquiry. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105; This course is designed to introduce you to the methods of systematic social scientific research and what researchers do and why. Social research does not consist of a formulaic complex of procedures and routines. Social research is a creative process that requires personal discipline, moral choices, and a commitment to the free and open inquiry into questions about the social world.
  • SOC 313 Computer Methods in Sociology. Prerequisite: SOC 210. This course is designed to help you learn how to use the statistical software package SPSS. While there will be some review of statistics; this is not a statistics course. You will learn how to code and enter data into SPSS; conduct and read the results of Independent-Samples t-Tests, Analysis of Variance, Regression and Correlation, and Crosstabs and Chi Square; and format, print, and present analysis of output.
  • SOC 320 Population-Natural Resources and Environment. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. This course is designed to introduce you to the tools and insights of demographic science and then places those insights in the historical context of world population change in order to better understand the interplay of human population and natural resource use. Additionally, the course explores the implications of the population growth on various natural resources. The course closes with a case study of an attempt to curb population growth in the developing world – in order to better understand the complexities of developing policy initiatives that address human population growth.
  • SOC 321 Soil, Environment, and Society. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Role of soil in our environment and its value as it relates to the social and economic well-being of society.
  • SOC 322 Introduction to Environmental Justice. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Unequal distribution of environmental risks, benefits, policies, and regulatory practices across different populations.
  • SOC 323 Sociology of Environmental Governance. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Roles of government and civil society in creating environmental problems and in developing effective responses to those problems.
  • SOC 324 Food Justice. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Food justice strives to eliminate exploitation and oppression by challenging the structural drivers within and beyond the food system. As a practice, food justice advocates for the right to healthy food that is justly and sustainably produced, recognizes diverse cultural foodways and histories, and promotes democratic participation and equitable distribution of resources in the food system.
  • SOC 330 Social Stratification. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. This course is designed to provide a review of the classical theories and debates regarding social stratification and considers their applicability in understanding inequalities in the modern world. The course analyzes the interconnections between social class, gender, and race/ethnicity and examines the ways in which these divisions structure our life chances and experiences. We will focus largely on issues of stratification in the current U.S. context but will conclude with a discussion of global stratification. (NT-O)
  • SOC 331 Community Dynamics and Development. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105; SOC 311. Nature of community: its institutions, problems and processes, including growth, disintegration, and development.
  • SOC 332 Comparative Majority-Minority Relations. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Discrimination, ideology, power, policy issues in the U.S. and selected societies; application of basic concepts in student’s self appraisal. (NT-O)
  • SOC 333 Gender and Society. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. The course is designed to delve into the realm of sex difference discourse. We will be analyzing how gender, class, and ethnic/racial inequalities intersect. We will also discuss the many different theoretical discussions of sex difference perspectives. Additionally, this course looks into how these socially created differences play out in family, work, and institutions.
  • SOC 334 Sociology of Intersectionality. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Multiple and intersecting ways race, class, gender, and sexuality shape society, individual life-chances, and daily social interactions.
  • SOC 340 Bureaucracy and Modern Organizations. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Structure and function of large-scale organization: coordination of activities between organizations and society.
  • SOC 341 Sociology of Rural Life. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Rural life in U.S. and Third World societies: analysis of sociocultural systems, social differentiation, social institutions, and problems of social change. (NT-T)
  • SOC 342 Leisure and Society. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Nature and purpose of leisure and work in society; influences of culture and social structure on leisure values and behavior.
  • SOC 343 Sport and Society. F, S. Sport as a microcosm of American society focusing on sport and values, socialization, institutions, stratification, race, and gender.
  • SOC 344 Health, Medicine, and Society. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. The impact of sociocultural factors like social class, gender, and race/ethnicity on health and illness in society and the social organization of healthcare delivery. The U.S. health care system.
  • SOC 352 Criminology. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. This course is designed to provide a theoretical approach to the study of crime in a contemporary society. Thus, a variety of criminological theories and classification concepts will be considered in relation to the causation of criminal behavior. This course will also expose students to research and criticisms of individual theories in the field of criminology. If time permits, we will explore and differentiate between various types of crime.
  • SOC 353 Criminal Investigations. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Examination of the social, organization, and applied facets of the criminal investigation process.
  • SOC 354 Law Enforcement and Society. Prerequisite: SOC 253. This course is designed to provide a foundation for understanding the rise and development of law enforcement as a social reaction to crime. The class will also cover social issues that pertain to contemporary police agencies. For example, we will address racial profiling, use of force, corruption, and community policing, among many other topics. Additionally, this course will explore research, policy developments and practical implications surrounding law enforcement.
  • SOC 358 Correctional Organizations. Prerequisite: SOC 253. This course is designed to examine the workings of the criminal justice system after a person is convicted of and sentenced for crimes. This course will address the history of corrections; issues relating to punishment and reform; victim’s rights; prisoner’s rights; the world of probation, jails, and prisons; the prisoner subculture, the corrections-officer subculture; the death penalty; and a variety of contemporary issues relating to corrections.
  • SOC 359 Green Criminology. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Environmental offenses, victims, and responses to environmental crimes and harms.
  • SOC 360 Political Sociology. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Analysis of power as a sociological concept, emphasizing competing theories of the state and power.
  • SOC 362 Social Change. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Sources of stability and stress in changing societies, consequences of planned and unplanned change; future trends.
  • SOC 364 Agriculture and Global Society. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. This course provides a sociological presentation and evaluation of the contemporary global agrifood system, paying particular attention to the production and contestation of social inequalities and environmental degradation. We will be investigating such relationships in the context of how different agrifood systems contribute to development and socioecological change both in the United States and throughout the world. Because problems in agrifood systems intersect with an array of other social systems we will also explore how people are creating and imagining alternatives. The course offers a wide ranging theoretical and empirical analysis from seed to table to trashcan of ways to understand socioecological change.
  • SOC 366 Peoples and Institutions of Latin America. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Change in the cultures and institutions of contemporary Latin America
  • SOC 371 Symbolic Interaction. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. This course is designed to introduce you to the basic concepts of micro-sociology. The organizing logic of the course will be the investigation of a paradox: social arrangements shape individuals while individuals simultaneously shape the social orders of which they are a part. The course will explore the acquisition of the self, socialization, social interaction, and culture, the social constructions of reality and knowledge, social location, and issues of identity.
  • SOC 372 Sociology of Deviance. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. The objective of this course is to immerse you into the multifaceted realm of social deviance. We will be studying the ever changing social normative construction of deviance and how its construction changes over time and place. We will investigate how sociologists study deviance and the theories used to explain the presence of deviance in society. Additionally,we will address how deviant identity is formed and structured. We will journey into deviant subcultures and explore their world-views.
  • SOC 375 Sociology of Religion and Medicine. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Descriptions and analyses of the roles and relationships of religion and medicine as modern social institutions.
  • SOC 403 Capstone Seminar. Prerequisite: SOC 210; SOC 301 or SOC 302; SOC 311; SOC 313. This course, the Capstone Seminar, is designed to provide graduating seniors an opportunity for reflecting upon and organizing their understanding of the discipline of sociology prior to being conferred their degree. The course will be one of reflection, discussion and conversation. To facilitate this, the Capstone is organized around a series of readings addressing important themes in sociology. In addition, you are asked to embark on an independent research project on a topic of your choosing.
  • SOC 422/ANTH 422 Comparative Legal Systems. Prerequisite: ANTH 100 or SOC 100. Credit not allowed for both SOC 422 and ANTH 422. Traditional approaches to law, competing concepts of law in the global system, and experiences of minorities in state legal systems.
  • SOC 429 Comparative Urban Studies. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. World urbanization and metropolitan development, measurement of growth and change in cities, and sociological perspective in planning.
  • SOC 431  Community Dynamics and Development. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105 and SOC 311. Nature of community; its institutions, problems and processes, including growth, disintegration, and development.
  • SOC 444/ETST 444 Federal Indian Law and Policy. Credit not allowed for both SOC 444 and ETST 444. Indian policy processes and their impact on Native lives and culture, particularly Native sovereignty.
  • SOC 450 Gender, Crime, and Criminal Justice. This course examines women’s and girl’s experiences with victimization and offending within the criminal processing system.
  • SOC 455 Sociology of Law. This course is designed to provide an analytical examination of the sociological origins, functions, and procedures of law in society. The course, and our primary text, is organized around three broad themes: access to the law, severity and leniency in the legal process and legal institutions, and the social organization of violence. In this context, particular emphasis will be given to relationships between the law and various aspects of the criminal justice system, how social factors influence access to the legal process and legal outcomes, and to current controversial legal issues.
  • SOC 460 Society and Environment. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Technology as a social phenomenon interacting with social organization and the natural environment.
  • SOC 461 Water, Society, and Environment. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Social aspects of water resource utilization; interface of social organization with physical environment. (NT-O)
  • SOC 462  Applied Social Change. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Applied sociology with a focus on research and practice designed to foster social change.
  • SOC 463 Sociology of Disaster. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. This course is designed to familiarize you with the interdisciplinary field of disaster research as well as with a range of sociological perspectives on the players, politics, consequences, origins and inequities associated with natural and technological hazards. The first portion of the semester will deal with the historical, methodological and applied aspects of disaster research. The second portion of the semester will address a number of in-depth case-studies and important themes in disaster literature.
  • SOC 474 Social Movements and Collective Behavior. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 105. Theory and research on causes, organizational structure, and outcomes of social movements and collective behavior.
  • SOC 482A, B Travel Study in Sociology. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in SOC 482A and SOC 482B. International and comparative issues in sociology. A) Criminal Justice Systems. B) Crime and Deviance.
  • SOC 487 Internship. Prerequisite: SOC 210; SOC 301 or SOC 302; SOC 311; SOC 313. Academic-based work experience with selected organizations or agencies. Supervised application of sociological principles and seminar participation.
  • SOC 492 Seminar. Prerequisite: SOC 210; SOC 301 or SOC 302; SOC 311; SOC 313; concurrent registration in SOC 487. This internship seminar (SOC492) is a companion to your internship (SOC487). This course has been designed to be taken concurrently with SOC487. As part of the capstone experience, we will review topics you have covered in earlier courses. However, we will give emphasis to more applied uses of what you have already learned, specifically a sociological critique of your collegiate education. This course will also provide the opportunity to integrate and deepen your understanding of sociology and to apply this understanding to your internship.
  • SOC 495 Var. Independent Study.
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